Transportation and Infrastructure

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We Will’s Transportation and Infrastructure pillar involves the conveyance of people, goods and information through the utilization of private or public vehicles, networks and systems.

Because transportation resources provide access to jobs, schools, health care facilities, parks and other amenities that are vital to Chicagoans' daily lives, We Will endeavors to ensure the CIty’s infrastructure assets are equitably planned, maintained, and upgraded to meet 21st century needs.

Rail lines, bus lines, streets, highways, alleys, airports, freight yards, waterways, bike lanes, sidewalks, trails, power grids, communications networks, and other public and private assets all fall within the scope of this pillar.

Chicago is already one for the most connected cities in the nation, with two international airports, expansive bus and train coverage, multiple interstate highways, extensive ride- and bike-share opportunities, and a gridiron street pattern that makes navigation a breeze for local or cross-town travel.

We Will planning can help Chicagoans further enhance their mobility, such as by helping commuters make easy and predictable transfers on public transit; ensuring that sidewalks and trails are safe and functional; that railroad stations offer predictable, reliable services; that roadways are well-maintained; and that all homes have equal access to broadband; among other goals.

Community dialog around the Transportation and Infrastructure pillar have emphasized the need for a people-centered approach to neighborhood accessibility, which research teams and focus groups will continue to expand and refine.

Public comments to date have involved the following themes:

  • Multi-modal transportation resources should be available citywide for people of all ability levels, providing options and alternatives that conveniently connect homes with population centers, jobs centers, shopping centers and other important destinations.
  • Diversity goals should recognize and accommodate the different needs of individuals with different mobility levels and ages, as well as the geographies of under-served neighborhoods.
  • Sustainable transportation modes, especially mass transit systems, should be incentivized to ensure they continue to accommodate local needs.
  • Technology should help people to access the city's transportation networks in real-time, including navigation aids and payments that may be required for users.
  • Maintenance should ensure all transit modes are safe, providing accountability and nurturing public-private partnerships to monitor current conditions and plans for the future.
  • Broadband access should be available in all neighborhoods, regardless of local income levels.

We Will’s Transportation and Infrastructure pillar involves the conveyance of people, goods and information through the utilization of private or public vehicles, networks and systems.

Because transportation resources provide access to jobs, schools, health care facilities, parks and other amenities that are vital to Chicagoans' daily lives, We Will endeavors to ensure the CIty’s infrastructure assets are equitably planned, maintained, and upgraded to meet 21st century needs.

Rail lines, bus lines, streets, highways, alleys, airports, freight yards, waterways, bike lanes, sidewalks, trails, power grids, communications networks, and other public and private assets all fall within the scope of this pillar.

Chicago is already one for the most connected cities in the nation, with two international airports, expansive bus and train coverage, multiple interstate highways, extensive ride- and bike-share opportunities, and a gridiron street pattern that makes navigation a breeze for local or cross-town travel.

We Will planning can help Chicagoans further enhance their mobility, such as by helping commuters make easy and predictable transfers on public transit; ensuring that sidewalks and trails are safe and functional; that railroad stations offer predictable, reliable services; that roadways are well-maintained; and that all homes have equal access to broadband; among other goals.

Community dialog around the Transportation and Infrastructure pillar have emphasized the need for a people-centered approach to neighborhood accessibility, which research teams and focus groups will continue to expand and refine.

Public comments to date have involved the following themes:

  • Multi-modal transportation resources should be available citywide for people of all ability levels, providing options and alternatives that conveniently connect homes with population centers, jobs centers, shopping centers and other important destinations.
  • Diversity goals should recognize and accommodate the different needs of individuals with different mobility levels and ages, as well as the geographies of under-served neighborhoods.
  • Sustainable transportation modes, especially mass transit systems, should be incentivized to ensure they continue to accommodate local needs.
  • Technology should help people to access the city's transportation networks in real-time, including navigation aids and payments that may be required for users.
  • Maintenance should ensure all transit modes are safe, providing accountability and nurturing public-private partnerships to monitor current conditions and plans for the future.
  • Broadband access should be available in all neighborhoods, regardless of local income levels.
Page last updated: 18 May 2022, 02:56 PM